Behavior Modification: Tempering Fire at the Landscape Level

Behavior Modification: Tempering Fire at the Landscape Level

With a history of management that suppressed fire, lands in western North America bear conditions that foster the growth of large or “problem fires”—conflagrations that escape initial attack and spread far from where they start. Fire hazards, as a result, are greater, and threaten values—the safety of our homes and communities, the protection of our watersheds, and the beauty of our natural lands. Adding to the hazard, homes are built in ever greater numbers at the wildland-urban interface (WUI). In recent years, catastrophic fires have grabbed public attention, stimulating renewed interest in fuel treatments and prompting new research studies. Mark Finney, fire science researcher with the USDA Forest Service’s Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory, has invested much of his time in providing answers and offering strategic planning tools to modify fire behavior.
 

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