NASA - Landsat Top Ten - Mount St. Helens: Volcanic Eruption and Recovery

NASA - Landsat Top Ten - Mount St. Helens: Volcanic Eruption and Recovery

Most of the geologic processes that shape our planet, such as the creeping movement of tectonic plates, are often too slow to see on human timescales, but every so often, geology produces a moment with in-your-face intensity. The explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington State on May 18, 1980, was such a moment.

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NASA - Landsat Top Ten: Columbia Glacier - A Swift Retreat

NASA - Landsat Top Ten: Columbia Glacier - A Swift Retreat

Water, water everywhere. Our planet has more surface covered with water than land, and some of that water has been held in cold storage. Glaciers, such as the Columbia Glacier in Alaska, both record Earth's climate in their dense layers of ice and affect the climate itself when their white surfaces reflect solar radiation back into space.

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NASA - Landsat Top Ten: A Searing Summer--Yellowstone National Park Historic Fires of 1988

NASA - Landsat Top Ten: A Searing Summer--Yellowstone National Park Historic Fires of 1988

Yellowstone National Park—the world’s first national park created in 1872—was transformed into an apparent wasteland during the three months of summer 1988 when it seemed that its beauty, and carefully legislated and shepherded legacy, would all go up in smoke. On June 14, 1988, just north of the park boundary, a small fire started on Storm Creek. Then, more fires started, sparked by both lightning and humans, and they multiplied and merged: Shoshone Fire, Fan Fire, Red Fire, Lava Fire, Mink Fire, Clover Fire, North Fork Fire, Hellroaring Fire, Huck Fire.

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